The Kên Hexagram 52


I Ching - Bound/Stabilising, Ken (KAN)

Keywords: Keeping Still.
Symbolic of stillness.

THE KAN HEXAGRAM
Ken above Ken
Number 52


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More hexagram interpretations by King Wan, James Legge and the Duke of Kau:-
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64

Or to go to Richard Wilhelm's interpretation and comments on this hexagram Click Here


King Wan's explanation of the Ken Hexagram

K'en denotes stopping or resting: resting when it is the time to rest, and acting when it is the time to act. When one's movements and restings all take place at the proper time for them, his way of proceeding is brilliant and intelligent.
Resting in one's resting-point is resting in one's proper place. The upper and lower lines of the hexagram exactly correspond to each other, but are without any interaction; hence it is said that the subject of the hexagram has no consciousness of self; that when he walks in his courtyard, he does not see any of the persons in it; and that there will be no error.

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Ken. Line translations by Dr. James Legge.
Hexagram

Kan. When one's resting is like that of the back, and he loses all consciousness of self; when he walks in his courtyard, and does not see any (of the persons) in it, there will be no error.

The Lines

1. The first Yin line, divided, shows its subject keeping his toes at rest. There will be no error; but it will be advantageous for him to be persistently firm and correct.

2. The second Yin line, divided, shows its subject keeping the calves of his legs at rest. He cannot help (the subject of the line above) whom he follows, and is dissatisfied in his mind.

3. The third Yang line, undivided, shows its subject keeping his loins at rest, and separating the ribs (from the body below). The situation is perilous, and the heart glows with suppressed excitement.

4. The fourth Yin line, divided, shows its subject keeping his trunk at rest. There will be no error.

5. The fifth Yin line, divided, shows its subject keeping his jawbones at rest, so that his words are (all) orderly. Occasion for repentance will disappear.

6. The sixth Yang line, undivided, shows its subject devotedly maintaining his restfulness. There will be good fortune.

Ken. Line translations by the Duke of Kau
Hexagram

The two trigrams representing a mountain, one over the other, form K'en. The superior man, in accordance with this, does not go in his thoughts beyond the duties of the position in which he is.

The Lines

1. He keeps his toes at rest: he does not fail in what is correct according to the idea of the figure.



2. He cannot help him whom he follows: he whom he follows will not retreat to listen to him.



3. He keeps the loins at rest: the danger from his doing so produces a glowing heat in the heart.



4. He keeps the trunk of his body at rest: he keeps himself free from agitation.

5. He keeps his cheek bones at rest: in harmony with his central position he acts correctly.



6. There is good fortune through his devotedly maintaining his restfulness: to the end he shows himself generous and good.


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